And, To All A Good Life!


Happy, safe, & enjoyable Holy Holidays to ALL!

ImageWhatever your belief, I hope this season finds you to be of good heart and generous character. We are all in this together and during this season, especially, we are given great opportunity to develop and express the spirit of brother & sisterhood to all, not just those in our circles, of our own race, ethnicity, gender, religion, etc. We can choose to honor and respect ALL life. We can choose Love over hate, acceptance over intolerance, and we can choose to exemplify standards of morality that will aid our children in respecting and Loving themselves and each other.

These are beautiful times, and yet, highly emotional times for many, many people.  While some of us will be enjoying connecting with family and friends over a great meal on Christmas, others will be grieving for those who are not present at the table this year. Others still may not have a table at which to feast. As well, there are families missing children, parents, friends, and even pets. There are those whose lives were upset by natural disasters and they have not recovered. We have so many unemployed who are stressing to bring home gifts for their children, or just food. There are people who are justly or unjustly incarcerated. They may be inhumanely treated even if their crime is minor. There are wars being fought and service men and women who will not be home for the holidays. While we have a lot for which to be thankful, the challenges may scream louder than our voice of gratitude. We are reminded to keep a soft light on in our hearts for our fellow sisters and brothers who are experiencing hard times. There are young folks without families who care about them and it becomes more pronounced during the holidays.

Suicides are on the rise during the winter season. S.A.D. aka Seasonal Affective Disorder may not be easily recognizable, but here are some signs Mayo Clinic asks us to watch out for:

  • Depression
  • Hopelessness
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of energy
  • Heavy, “leaden” feeling in the arms or legs
  • Social withdrawal
  • Oversleeping
  • Loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed
  • Appetite changes, especially a craving for foods high in carbohydrates
  • Weight gain
  • Difficulty concentrating

The holidays also tend to have people rushing around for gifts, holiday parties or just running to get that last task completed before taking off on holiday vacation. Rushing causes mindlessness and accidents of any nature can occur. This is a time to slow down and take heed of what’s in your surroundings. You may be running around so quickly that you don’t even realize you didn’t hold that heavy store door open for the next person, who may have been an elder, a child or a person with physical disabilities. Or perhaps, you have a long list of gifts to buy and didn’t find that item at the store you’re at and need to make a mad dash to another store. This may result in your driving too close and not have enough space to stop when the car in front of you brakes without warning, or speeding and losing control. And, those Christmas parties may have you drinking a bit too much. You can avoid the backlash if you keep your mind with you. Plan ahead and decide to drink and behave responsibly. Believe me, there is no better gift than the gift of life. No gift you can give is better than you being able to show up or to stay alive and safe.

There are those who have gone through tumultuous times this year and are thrilled to be beyond the depths of their struggle. “Yay, it’s over,” is their cheer! Their gift is that they can now finally exhale after months or a year of great trials. There are others who need Forgiveness and to Forgive a large or small transgression. Whatever the case, let us strive to be vehicles of goodness to ourselves and each other. We do not know what another person is feeling when they have that scowl on their face. It may be an incredibly hard time for that person. They don’t need our grief to add to their own. And, unless they are doing harm, we can ignore a bit of rudeness or meet it with a smile, if we just let ourselves slow down a bit and consider what another may be feeling beyond the surface.

This is a time for deepening, cleansing, and releasing what no longer serves our good, especially our Divine Goodness. Please take moments of Silence throughout your day and give thanks for your many precious treasures. Taking moments of Silence also allows us to make better choices with our reactions to adverse situations, avoiding the off-the-cuff responses for which later we may need to apologize. Let’s choose to keep an open Heart for those who may need our Kindness and Compassion. Tis the Season to Forgive. The best changes start within our own selves. Let us be of service where we are guided to be, and use the power of Prayer, powerfully positive affirmations when we are shown our place is to be on the sidelines, not to meddle or interfere in another’s process. Every season is a season for growth and new understandings. Please keep your focus on remaining safe and choose to do no harm.

The very best to you ALL! And, to all a good life! ❤

HUNTERS BEWARE: OUR CHILDREN ARE OFF LIMITS!


This morning I watched a video of a 7-year-old girl who was almost abducted at a Wal-Mart in GeorgiaChild fights off would-be abductor.

It reminded me of an experience I had a couple of days before Christmas while shopping at the Fox Hills Mall in Culver City.  My granddaughter was visiting L.A., as was I, and she wanted to stretch her $40 to get a few gifts. So, my mom and niece suggested she start at the Wal-Mart located in the mall.

After I made certain the girls kept a good eye on their grandmother/great-grandmother, my plan was to sneak out and get a “Hello Kitty” bracelet made for my granddaughter without her getting a whiff of the surprise.  As I began walking from the back of the huge store to the exit, a little girl, I’ll call “Brandy,” with stringy blonde hair and the sweetest face appeared just a couple of feet from the end of the aisle. Brandy called out to me. Surprised, I continued toward her and she asked me for help.

It’s amazing when little people have the veracity and calm to approach a stranger for help and know exactly who to trust. Brandy told me that she had lost her family, but when I asked about her mother, she said she was at home. My first fear was that  she had been abandoned, but in her gibberish, I realized that Brandy had been with other family members.

Brandy quickly grabbed my hand and we started walking as I called out to the shoppers, “Small child lost! Anyone looking for their daughter?” I asked Brandy if it was alright for me to pick her up so people could see her better. (It was also better for my back.) She gave me a darling smile. Apparently, she, too, wanted to be carried.

Brandy had a remarkably calm demeanor and conversed with me like we were old friends. I was particularly touched by her comfort with me. She kept one arm gripped around my neck,  and at times placed her head on my shoulder, drawing my motherly love around her like a protective tigress.

Hearing my call to the Wal-Mart shoppers, a young male security guard walked up to us and said he’d take the child. I politely refused and could feel her relief as her grip tightened. Our bond had become special and she felt assured I’d take her to safety. I offered the guard to walk with us, guide us to the customer service, and, most importantly, to make a “lost child” store announcement. I convinced the guard, “it’s not personal, dear, but the little sweetheart chose me to help her find her family because she felt safe with me.” It was clear that I wasn’t going to release her to anyone that was not her family.

The security guard left us, but crossed paths with us again a few minutes later. Again, I requested that he make an announcement that a little child was looking to be reunited with her family. It irked me that something as simple as making a full store announcement was not the immediate response of the store security. By now, a male and female security guard were aware of the child’s dilemma, but neither had made any motion to make an announcement.

In the meantime, I heard a voice a few feet away, “Picking up strays now, are you?” Then, laughter ensued as my niece and granddaughter walked up looking amazed and amused. Little Brandy waved her hand from left to right at them both and asked, “Is this your family?” The gesture was so cute that we all burst out laughing. I managed to answer affirmatively. The three of them began a conversation, and then, my mom appeared looking bewildered. She thought I should turn the child over to the store security. We all exclaimed, “No!” That’s when Mom really saw Brandy. That darling child had engaged her, too.  A few moments later, a tattered looking young man with a boy about 5 years old spotted us.

Brandy’s wide smile was indication enough to let us know that they were her family. Still holding on to me like I was her dear friend, she cheered, “That’s my daddy!” It took her a second to let me go, as she thanked me with a squeeze. I handed her over to her worried-looking father. With a look of embarrassment and relief, he thanked me profusely.

Mom, the quintessential grandmother and great-grandmother walked over to Brandy’s father and had a grandmotherly chat with him. As we were leaving Wal-Mart, we asked her what she told him.  Mom shared, with raised brow, that Brandy and her brother had been allowed to play hide ‘n’ seek under the clothing racks  (something her children would have never been allowed to do, by the way) when Brandy got lost. Mom’s wise words to the father were, “This is not the climate to leave your children unattended, even for a moment.” He seemed to digest her words well and with appreciation. We were all glad it turned out so gracefully.

My best advice for a parent is that you teach your children good survival skills while keeping them prayed up. Watch them with a hawk’s eye, as much as you are able. That 7-year-old who was almost kidnapped fortunately got away. It’s often not the case. Keep your little ones close to you, especially  when you are in places where they can easily become lost or get snatched. The beasts who steal children are hunters and have the patience of hunters.

Build a trustworthy network. Your children are worth every moment of your time. Above all treat your children with love and respect. They grow up faster than you can imagine.